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to be the guy who is very conservative, catholic, he's got a great education track record but i think is going to be well-positioned to be, if we're going to modernize someone we feel safer, he could be the guy. >> one last word on the millennials since we did have that question. according to the data i missing, it doesn't look like obama shares the millennial vote, its operational shores -- is creeping up. he did win it 66-32 in 2008. he's not there yet, 34-point margin. the pupil had about a 30-point margin. that's getting close. 56% of what all is said and done he may be wind up with a bird outside margin among millennials, but just not as big as he had in 2008, and, of course, another related question is whether and to what extent these votes will turn out. in 2012. so keep in mind in 2008 it wasn't that astronomical. >> the racial mix. >> absolutely right. >> the white millennials are noticeably more liberal. >> he was at 55% among whites under 30. in our poll we have him down to 50. >> that's pretty good. but anyway, short answer is looking pretty good for obama, maybe not quite as good
and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to address so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in education. >> she is an education campaign and fighting vested interest to change those figures. >> the political issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the second session of the day. brazil h
>>> on our broadcast tonight, from education nation in new york, drawing the line. the president today with a strong new warning to iran, plus what he had to say about the recent violence against americans. where they stand. a rare chance to hear from both candidates right here on one critical issue, education and how to fix american schools. our interviews with the president and governor romney here tonight. >>> the replacement. the call that had football fans across the country howling at the nfl to bring back the professional referees. >>> and tighten up. how little space could you live in? some folks in san francisco are about to find out. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening and tonight we're in midtown manhattan, high above the new york city public library, which for the past few days has been the headquarters of education nation, our annual summit on education where today we heard from both president obama and mitt romney, a rare and fascinating opportunity to hear them both out on one issue in the same day, something th
how vitally dependent the country is on a trained, educated, likable, young adult population. we have not quite recognized the deficit we have. as for the state level, a lot has happened. we work at the state level. we attempt to put together coalitions that recognize the importance of educating kids from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more business people who get the reality. they are understanding the situation and are increasingly ready to take action. in the area lisa pointed to, educating early solves educational problems. we published a report last march. it is on the website. it is a way to reduce special education costs. we know quality pre-kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields in reduction in special education costs alone enough to pay for the services. at the state level, there is an understanding that takes place that people can act on. it can better be done on the school district level. the power of technology is enabling people at local levels to act in ways they cannot at the federal level. as they act at the local and state level, it becomes clear that th
more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >> a campaign marked by harsh accusations, it is rare to see a movement of bipartisan levity but that came today courtesy of mitt romney. this is what he had to say after being introduced by president clinton. >> if there is one thing we have learned in this election season, by the way, it is that a few words from bill clinton can do a man of lot of good. all i need to do now is wait a couple of days for that bounce to happen >> that was a clear nod to the president clinton's speech praising the president. both brawny and president obama were talking about foreign policy today in new york. >> president obama is urging fellow leaders to take a stand against violence in the moslem world >> i do believe it is the obligation of all leaders in all countries to speak out forcefully a
at this testimony. i would like to begin by thanking you for your genuine passion on this topic can educate all americans about the importance. i know is we've spent time over the years, we think about of course your home state and robust aviation community in the state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of the most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with bea. and with that said tamayo so juxtaposed my thoughts and comments regarding matches the home base of operation that i come from at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion in the air space challenges have across places like the metropolitan area and here i am the metropolitan area. all of this site, mr. chairman and certainly two ranking member costello as well, and over the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they had been in your congressional districts across the country and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. your palate hearings, conduct of information on sessions and have an open door as he sought not to assign
are perhaps the most important innovation in public education over the last generation in the united states. but there are many myths and misconceptions about charters and about the motivation and the goal of many in the movement. use of some of that play out in the recent chicago future strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states to the best charters are either an unmitigated good or alternatively, an existential threat. .. >> if we are going to get back to the living standards of america, we are only going to do that by lifting up and truly changing public education in this country. that is the only way that is ever going to be achieved. so with that, let me introduce roland fryer. he is going to summarize his paper. he is going to do 34 slides in one hour. >> thank you very much. it is great to be here again and to see so many familiar faces. >> let's start with this first. good morning. we all know that education in america, visited the show that our performance has grown over the last 30 to 40 years. if you look at the latest statistics as to how many schools didn't
. but when it comes to education we are not. we are dead last. as the world becomes more technoledge kal, 20 years from now, what is america. when we are boeing to understand the technology that we are going to be relying upon. >> if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped it. moved my family out. people in the ghetto have no clue of where we are going. that is what we need to get them excited on. we need to get them excited about stem. educating people to caulk into the world and contribute and participate. the common thread throughout the middle east and america is a lot of young people who have had education in middle eastern countries, and there is no job at the end of the line for them and this creates huge resentment and frustration you have seen a lot of leaders being toppled. what do leaders and countries need to adopt to stop this cycle now youth who feel not able to fulfill their potential? >> economic development. when you have young people with amazing ideas. you don't have the system to actually deal with this huge issue add to that the governments that have fallen, the new st
of the energy solution investments in education and infrastructure. so we'll talk about how to move forward billing off of the last four years. >> eliot: all of that is clear and i think correct. but it doesn't fully answer what will happen. john boehner odds are, is still likely to be speaker of the house. >> sure. >> eliot: in which case you will have a tough negotiation with him. can you pledge to the american people that you will stand rigid in opposing extension of the bush tax cuts for the wealthiest americans? >> the president's economic team knows they have a mountain to climb in front of them in terms of dealing with congress. the congressional leadership on the republican side came together the day the president was nominated and said we care more about score political points than working with this president. change comes by engaging people outside of washington, and putting pressure on the leakership in congress. so that's what we are going to do, and continue to do that, we hope the speaker and other republican leaders will come to the table. this is a time
do in some shape or form but when it comes to education we're not. we're dead last when it comes to education. as the world becomes more technological, 20 years from now, what is america when you didn't educate people to understand the technology we are relying upon. if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped the ghetto, moved my whole family out. people in the ghetto have no clue of where we are going techno logically. and stem is the future. that's what we need to get 7-year-olds geared upon. we need to get them excited about stem. that's sustainability, as well. a different type of sustainability. it is educating people to walk in the world where they can contribute and participate in this global community year 2040. >> princess prosecute ameerah al-taweel the common thread is education that they couldn't have had before but there is no job at the end of the line for them. this creates resentment and frustration. so much so you have seen a lot of leaders being toppled and i'm sure there will be more to come. what is it that leader and countries need to adopt to stop this hor
on a special education nation of "your business." >> hi, there, everyone. i'm j.j. ramberg. welcome to "your business." the show dedicated to giving you tips and advice thoeping your small business grow. it is education nation week. we wanted to do our part by looking at the opportunities available to current and future entrepreneurs. our past stories have taken us around the country to detroit and portland, oregon. this year, we didn't have to go any further than boston. there, we found a really unique program, a venture aksel lccele that's run by college students. they have the right idea educating entrepreneurs and getting them funding to grow their companies. 22 small business owners. >> our product will be the first organic, low-calorie ready to drink cocktail on the market. >> each one making a pitch for funding. and the most amazing thing. >> we have done a real lot with a real little. >> some of these pictures aren't even out of college yet. >> the marketing is essential. >> this pitchathon is part of a unique program called idea, a business accelerator that is developing new entrepr
or an educator but i think if these kids are hungry i guess my solution would be, eat your mother [bleep] lunch! (laughter) you know whose's not hungry in your old pal remmy counting out in the dumpster. because you gave him your lunch. so the usda which has been setting guidelines for subsidized school lunch force the past, oh, i don't know, 70 years, has, i'm trying to curb what everybody agree says childhood obesity problem changed the last year's school lunch men fru cheese pizza, canned pie nap app-- ian apple, tater tots into whole wheat cheez pizzar, applesauce and low fat milk. oooh. why is this news? >> new guidelines thanks to michelle obama, michelle obama school lunch calorie limits. >> michelle obama nutritional school lunches. >> jon: oh, man, oh, right, that's right. because this isn't really about food or kids. it's about big government uber thanny michelle obama who if she said we feed clean air half the country would demand gills because freedom! listen the complaint. >> the usda shouldn't be deciding how many calories we take or how many calories we expend during the day. at
tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>grant: nfl replacement rest got it wrong and it cost the packers the game. people are sounding off on facebook. we asked people, what do you think about this debacle. >> we always want to know we you think. heads our kron4 facebook fan page to do that. does >>pam: a pregnant woman injured in shooting in oakland. kron4 is on the scene, and we will have a live update at 5:30 p.m.. >> today we're looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> governor brown visited the google headquarters to sign a bill that allows a global driverless cars one step closer to our roads. >>pam: a few other new laws signed today. a new plan for state parks in the wake of plant closures and the scandal. those stories and more coming up at 5:30 p.m.. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you
to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver. only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. >> tomorrow afternoon, a lot of fees at noon, i do not think it will get that much warmer tomorrow. i think it was the low 80s out there, possibly '90s in morgan hill. for the inland valleys we have a better chance of seeing nineties in fact we will in places like antioch and livermor
, but a nonprofit, a charity in its filing with the irs saying its mission is education. which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot, too. >> in wisconsin, i cannot take anything of value from a lobbyist. i cannot take a cup of coffee. at alec, it is the opposite. you are wined and dined for days in order to hear about the special legislation. the head of shell oil fluid on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one of the largest utility companies was on the panel. he is presenting to legislators. they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate needs and special interest-dom and in meetings with legislators. >> the united states of alec. we will return to the special report by bill moyers in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we turn to part two of "the united states of alec." a special report by bill moyers airing this week on lawyers in company, but premiering today of here on "democracy now!" >> the most important business hap
of quality in a child care setting is the training and education of the workforce, if we can up the bar on that. i think there's a lot that can be done. i think that, as far as quality is concerned -- you have about 28 states with a quality rating system. that is a really good thing. it is tough to be a parent. what questions do you ask? what do you look for? i think every parent wants the warm person who is going to be friendly and nice and you can click with because you want somebody who will love your children, but at the same time, the expectation should be if you are in a business with children, there should be other criteria. you should not have a history of violent offenses, so you would be no harm to the child. you should have some minimum training so that what you are doing can nurture the children and, hopefully, put them in a situation better ready to succeed when they start school. unfortunately, as i said, what we have seen from our studies is that is not happening. i want to end with one other thing it is called parents and the high costs of child care. we are not where we
, and my fathermented us to have an education, and he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i think he thought all of us would just come right back home and try to work from there, but i grew up with lots of family and community support. i grew up, went to a segregated school. when they -- when brown versus board of education passed, georgia's answer was to just throw up these schools to supposedly give us equal, separate, but equal facilities so i only -- i only attended segregated schools, but in those schools, we had people who cared. we had teachers who cared, but they all -- one thing they drilled into us in the church, in our homes, and in the schools was that they expected us to do good. they expected us to go and do good and reach back and help others. [applause] >> it's interesting you say that because in the country right now, day three of the huge teacher strike in chicago so there's a battle right now for the soul of education, public education. >> yes. >> your daddy was killed by a white fellow. >> yes. >> go back to that time and what happened, what you kn
girls getting educated. we provide freeducation to over 350 girls. i think it's like a fire that will grow. every year, my hope becomes more. i think i can see the future. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "early start weekend." >> i believe she should resign, yes. >>> a top lawmaker calling for a u.s. ambassador to resign. we have reaction to the new intelligence report that the benghazi attack that killed four americans was an act of terror. >>> abortion, gun policy, the war on drugs. some of these social issues shaping the presidential race. all morning, we put them in focus. >> i can see in his face that there was a lot more to her story than even what she was willing to let on. >>> women hold up half the sky. the message of a new documentary from "new york times" columnist. in an interview exclusive with cnn he sits down with celebrities. >>> saturday, september 29th, i'm deb feyerick. >> good to have you with us this morning. we are starting with the new revelations on the deadly attack in libya. >> the attack that killed chris stevens and three other
an archive of a disappearing world? >> the education system that is a national machine turning up highly motivated students, what happens if a child does not fit the stereotype? our correspondent has been taking a look at a very different side of south korean education. >> to be successful in south korea, students need a obedience, discipline, and an insatiable appetite for study. at this alternative high school, success is measured slightly differently, in happiness. here the curriculum offers board games as well as mathematics. if you would never give away with this in a normal korean school. this is where they come when they fall off of the education conveyor belt. the teaching here is everything the traditional schooling is not. a would-be chefs with a troubled past. >> there were too many regulations of my old school. i had trouble sticking to them and i got angry. i used to bully and fight with other kids. that my parents got angry, so i ran away from home and i would get into other bad things. >> here he says the teachers are not only more relaxed, but crucially they teach at the
you can start figuring that out sooner. in fact, by thinking about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. a 13 year-old is aacused of stealinggthis car, leading and crashing the vehicle.it happened in nootherr califorria. it all started when officers spotted the reported stolen police say he 13-yeaa-old took off ann flipped he car about a mleelater. hh teen was rushed to the hossital after the crash, but asslater released into his mother's ((2-shot toss to ((ad lib meteorollgist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs)) 3 3 3 3 ad libs))((traffic reporter 3 meteorologist))((ad lib weather)) ((ad lib , meteorrlogist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs)) 3 3 &p3 3 3 3- ((traffic reporter 3 meteorologist))((ad lib &weathe ((ad lii meteorologist)))) 3 meteorologist))((ad lii ((ad lib meteorologist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad llbs)) &pmap bel air map wilkens map quaranttne ,33 3 are you our biggest an?then you can become.. ouu fan of everyday we'll pick one of our viewers f
, i don't know why the men would want to hurt them. that's because he had been educated by women and encouraged, from the first moment and nurtured by a women who was empowered and he was able to see the world through a completely different lens. that's why it's about empowering the women to impact the men. it's not that the men are inherently the problem. unfortunately, they've been raised in a culture that hasn't encouraged them to see the world. >> what a remarkable spirit changing the world and changing men one at a time. >>> next hour, actress gabrielle union tells us about meeting a 15-year-old girl in vietnam who stunned her with extraordinary courage. turning oppression into opportunity for women worldwide is going to air on pbs on monday and tuesday. >>> there is more positive news on the home front, if you're in the market to sell. home prices on the rise for the third straight month. we'll tell you where. like myself... ing i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> attention san francisco shoppers, bring your own bag or it will cost you. starting tomorrow a citywide ordinance banning the use of plastic bags will go into effect for all retail stores. currently the ban only effects large super markets and pharmacies. don't have a bag? well, you will be charged 10 cents for every paper bag that you need. >> i think that we should pay for the damage that we are doing out there in the environment. if we can have the two second thought, i have a bag to reuse and that is great. >> the city will hand out free reusable bags at more than 50 events across the city during october and november. >>> well, just last year there was talk of drastic service cuts, now, cal trains is adding trains to meet demand.
's a provocative new approach to education called grit, meant to give kids just that. >> it's really about how do you get kids actually to not only experience failure but recognize that those hard moments are the keys to future success. >> i would say i don't trust anyone who hasn't failed. >> right, right. >>> and kate snow reports on a man who learned his quirks were much more than just odd behavior. >> i would silently freak out. >> and turn to a very unlikely teacher for help. >> i have been in therapy now for 16 years. >> you have literally studied howard stern? >> yeah. >>> plus one big secret of jon stewart's success on "the daily show." >>> and how the fifty shades novels have saved a tiny town in maine. >> so the big question is, have you read it? >> you said you weren't going to ask me that question. >> i was lying. >> all that and more on "rock center with brian williams." >>> good evening, and welcome. right now, as of tonight, 1.4 million of our fellow citizens are serving on active duty in the u.s. military. they're serving domestically and all over the world, and after a decade of
as a politician is hoping to change the game of education, to make it possible for all kids regardless of background or race to get the kind of schooling that will enable them to live their lives beyond a dream. >> kevin johnson of sacramento, california believes the time is now to issue a wakeup call to address the state of education among youth in america. johnson says the real facts are alarming. schools are failing children, which is why it's launched a program called stand up for great schools. it's an evaluational initiative, a fight for kids to achieve a solid foundation in school. >> i thought education was supposed to be my future. >> he believes you can't have a great city without great schools. >> the time is now. we're losing our children. if we as a faith community don't lead the way, then who do we think is going to lead the way. >> kelly: jonathan helped to organize the faith leaders policy summit recently held in atlanta, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, a
for the board of education and to me if you are a citizen you get to vote. if you are not a citizen, you don't get to vote. if it's easier to perhaps we need to look at how easy it is to become a citizen, but my experience is if you want parent to participate in their children's education, get them involved in their schools. i feel a little differently at the community college level, because at that time they are adults themselves, i'm assumingand that is more like the dream act and it's an interesting proposal. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, miss johnson and mr. resignato. >> a couple of years ago then mayor gavin newsom vetoed a bill to distribute alcoholic beverages. it would be used for costs for alcohol consumption. in this year's election the city of richmond will vote on a tax for penny on sugary beverages.eqc to encourage healthier behavior and recover the cost of providing medical services to people who become sick from alcoholic abuse or unhealthy diets? >> no. >> london breed, no. [ laughter ] >> you are up first, right? >> miss johnson? >> i agree wi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 576 (some duplicates have been removed)